Cornerstone Cares: Blessing Our Unsung Heroes

Since the COVID19 took a toll on Singapore, it was on our heart as a church to reach out to the community, especially our migrant workers, taxi drivers and the frontline workers who were most impacted by the pandemic.


In a time when the human instinct would be self-preservation, the pastors strongly felt that this was a Kairos opportunity to reach out and bring hope and care to others in a time of need and fear.


Cornerstone Cares was born out of this desire to bless others, and the introduction of pandemic restrictions required us to think of creative ways to reach out remotely, since everyone was confined to their homes.


Our Taxi Drivers

To show care towards taxi drivers who have been hit hard by the crisis, Cornerstone Community Services teamed up with the National Taxi Association, Changi Airport and Cornerstone Community Church to distribute lunch packs to the drivers at Changi Airport. The pastors and staff took part in this initiative on 27-28 February 2020, bringing encouragement to the taxi drivers, who were waiting for hours in the line. One taxi uncle shared that he did not have the time to have his lunch yet and was hungry; getting a lunch pack was like an answered prayer!


In a time when the human instinct would be self-preservation, the pastors strongly felt that this was a Kairos opportunity to reach out and bring hope and care to others in a time of need and fear.

Our Frontline Heroes

Our Cell groups came together to pack and distribute 1300 care packs to the community – consisting of food items, hand sanitisers and wipes, health supplements and a personally written card for the recipients. Many of these were given to cleaners, hawkers, and those in the service industry. (Read about their testimonies here)


The Children’s ministry encouraged our Sunday school children from ages 7 to 12, to pen notes of thanks to our frontline heroes. These were sent to Tan Tock Seng Hospital’s National Centre for Infectious Diseases, Singapore Civil Defence Force and national leaders.



Migrant Workers in Dormitories

Ps Lip rallied teams to go into the dormitories to serve meals to the workers and show appreciation for all they have done for Singapore, working tirelessly to build our beautiful city. Doctors and healthcare workers who were part of the church stepped forward to educate the workers about the implications of Covid-19 and the importance of good hygiene practices.


However, as the pandemic situation evolved and the number of cases increased, we were no longer able to meet the workers physically as soon as the nationwide Circuit Breaker kicked in.



The spread was especially rapid among the migrant workers, and they had to be in isolation within the confines of their shared rooms for a stipulated time, to curb the spread. As such, we sent 30,000 care packs to the dormitories, consisting of dried food, toiletries and basic necessities that the workers would need.


Amidst the Circuit Breaker Period, a total of 23 Cell groups and 64 individuals came on board to contribute and customise care packages, some even leaving heartfelt notes of encouragement for Telegu Congregant members residing in these locations. The English congregation Cell groups and families also adopted a Telegu brother to reach out to and care for during this trying time, and the brothers were especially moved by the love received.


Ps Nelson David, who pastors the Telegu Congregation was connecting with the brothers over Zoom during this time, observed that many were filled with fear, anxiety, loneliness and depression. They were worried about their future, and some of them who had just come to Singapore were concerned that they would lose their jobs and have to go back. Emotional and spiritual strength was what was needed, and the brothers were thankful for all the calls and gifts.


Spreading the joy they had received, the Telegu brothers in turn went on to share their gifts with those who stayed in their dormitories.

From a handwritten note in the Telegu language to Milo tins and hand sanitisers, these warmed the hearts of those who received them. “Pastor, thank you so much. God loves us. I don’t know them and they don’t know us, but they are sending us so much to eat,” was one of the texts that Ps Nelson received.


Spreading the joy they had received, the Telegu brothers in turn went on to share their gifts with those who stayed in their dormitories. “Unbelievers are watching how the church is taking care of them and asking why the church shows so much concern for them. I want to thank God for the light that has been shown to them through Cornerstone,” shared Ps Nelson.









Now that migrant workers in Singapore have returned to work, the work of blessing the community continues at “The Barn” at Penjuru, a thrift shop helmed by Cornerstone Community Services. The shop is frequented by migrant workers who are looking for affordable clothing, footwear and accessories. Word has it that some items are wiped out in a matter of hours after they are displayed, and the shop has been a huge blessing to patrons. Donations of pre-loved items in mint condition are still welcome, so do drop them off at the shop during operating hours!


As believers, we must continue to be carriers of His love regardless of the circumstances we are under. In this time and season, we need to be attentive and ready to offer ourselves as His hands and feet. Jesus cares for them, and because He does, so do we. Let’s continue to be salt and light.


For more information on how to contribute or volunteer at The Barn, reach out here.